Sunday, February 23, 2020

GREETINGS FROM YOUR ENGLISH TEACHER



MY DEAR LEVEL 2 STUDENTS: Hi! this blog is an additional tool to learn effectively and encourages the student to learn as much as he wants about a certain topic, and not only what is taught in the book. IMPORTANT: this blog is not meant to be the class on line, it only highlights and enhances what is taught by your teacher in class. You´re welcome to write any comments and suggestions, and of course, to take as much advantage of this blog as you can.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

CHAPTER 2: COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS


COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS (Student´s book p.12)
  • Count nouns are the ones you can count. Count nouns have a singular and a plural form.
          Examples:          I have an orange.
                                    She has five oranges.

  • Non-count nouns are the ones you can´t count. Non-count nouns have only one (singular) form.
           Examples:          Where is the flour?
                                      The flour is on the counter.

Workbook p.p. 12-13

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USE OF ANY (page 13 student´s book)

The word ANY is used in negative statements and questions only, with non-count nouns and plural count nouns.
 Examples:
                 Is there any meat in the refrigerator?
                 No, there isn´t any meat in the refrigerator

                 Are there any potatoes in the cabinet?
                 No, there aren´t any potatoes in the cabinet.

                 - Let´s make some pizza for dinner!
                 - Sorry, we can´t. There isn´t any cheese.

Workbook: p.p.14-15



MUCH/ A LITTLE                       MANY/A FEW
Count and non-count nouns take different determiners.

  • The determiners much and a little are used with non-count nouns.
       Examples:        - How much sugar do you want with your coffee?
                              - Just a little (sugar)

                              - How much milk do you want (with your coffee)?
                              - Not too much, just a little.
  • The determiners many and a few are used with count nouns.
       Examples:        - How many meatballs do you want?
                              - Just a few (meatballs).

                               - How many cookies do you want?
                               - Not too many, just a few.

Workbook: p.p. 16-17

HOW MANY? / HOW MUCH? GAME

Of the nouns written below, ask the proper question:

french fries                                    butter                                        
orange juice                                   rice
sugar                                             grapes
hamburguers                                  apples
sandwiches                                     eggs
flour                                               bread
mayonnaise                                    onions

TEAM GAME

  • Name three breakfast foods.
  • Name three luch foods.
  • Name three dinner foods.
  • Name three dessert foods.
What food can you make with flour, eggs, sugar, butter and milk?
What food can you make with flour, tomatoes and cheese?
What food can you make with meat, bread, ketchup and mustard?


HOW DO I KNOW IF IT´S COUNTABLE OR UNCOUNTABLE?

The non-coun nouns are also called uncountable or mass nouns.


What nouns are uncountable?


- Materials: wood, cotton, linen, silk, steel etc.             - Luggage  
- Advice                                                                     - Travel
- Hair                                                                        - Weather
- Knowledge                                                              - Information
- Spaguetti                                                                - Machinery
- English (language)                                                   - Furniture
- Health                                                                     - Intelligence
- Education                                                                - Clothing
- Soap                                                                       - Air
- Literature                                                                - Water


Examples:
  English is easy.                                    That was very much information.
  You have too much luggage.                 That furniture is expensive!
  Your advice was very useful.                 This machinery is very modern.

More information about count and non-count nouns:
http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/agree2a.html

WANT TO DO SOME EXERCISES WITH COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS?
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/count1.htm
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/par_numberless_quiz.pl/nouns_quiz.htm

NOW THE GAME!!
YOU HAVE TO KILL ALL THE COUNT NOUNS! BULLETS LIMITED, TIME LIMITED...READY? KIL 'EM ALL!

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

CHAPTER 3: PARTITIVES

INTRODUCTION OF PARTITIVES (SB: p.20)

a bag of                                a jar of
a bottle of                             a loaf of (two loaves of)
a bunch of                            a pint of
a box of                                a pound (lb) of
a can of                                a half pound of / half a pound of
a gallon of                            a quart of
a head of                              a dozen


  • Non-count nouns can't be counted, but they may be measured. Partitives measure specific quantities of non-count nouns. Partitives can be counted.
        Examples:        a head of lettuce
                                two heads of lettuce

                                a can of soup
                                two cans of soup


  •  Partitives can measure by weight or size.
         Examples:       a pound of cheese.
                                a gallon of milk.
                                a quart of orange juice.
                                a pint of ice cream.


  • Partitives can measure by describing the container.
        Examples:        a box of cereal
                                a bag of flour
                                a can of soup
                                a jar of jam
                                a bottle of ketchup


  • Partitives can measure by describing the shape.
        Examples:        a bunch of carrots
                                a head of lettuce
                                a loaf of bread


  • More partitives:
                                a bowl of                     a glass of
                                a cup of                       an order of
                                a dish of                      a piece of

       Examples: A bowl of strawberries
                        a cup of coffee
                        a dish of salad
                        a glass of water
                        an order of bacon
                        a piece of apple pie
                        


  • English measurements are different from the metric system:
        1 pound                 = 0.45    kilograms
        1 pint                     = 0.475 liters
        1 quart (2 pints)     = 0.95   liters
        1 gallon (4 quarts)  = 3.8     liters
WB: p.p. 21-23

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HOW MUCH DOES A HEAD OF LETTUCE  COST?
DOLLARS AND CENTS (SB p.21)
  • Cent prices are written in two ways: with a cent sign (c) or with a dollar sign ($) and a decimal point.
        Examples: 10 c  =  $0.10
                         75 c  =  $0.75


  • There are two ways of expressing prices: formal and informal.
        Examples:   $1.25    =  (formal) one dollar and twenty-five cents
                                            (informal) a dollar twenty-five
               
                            $10.50  =  (formal) ten dollars and fifty cents
                                             (informal) ten fifty


WB: p. 24





WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE? (p.23 SB)

                                                  for breakfast/lunch/dinner?

 What would you like                   to eat/ drink/order?

                                                  for dessert?
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W.B.: p.p 25-26


RECIPES


  • The imperative is the base form of the verb, with you as the understood subject. The imperative is used to give introductions.
         Ex.: Chop up a few onions.
                 Add a little salt.


LET'S MAKE A RECIPE!

1.-  A quart/cold water                                 2.- 5 eggs            pepper
      Lemon Juice                                                 milk               butter
      Sugar                                                           salt                cheese

3.- Lettuce                                                    4.- hot milk
     tomatoes                                                       chocolate
     carrots                                                           sugar

5.- butter                                                       6.- butter
      milk                                                               salt
      flour                                                              onions
      eggs                                                              mushrooms
      salt                                                                water
      chocolate                                                       tomatoes
      baking powder                                               carrots
      sugar                                                             pepper



Friday, February 25, 2011

CHAPTER 4: FUTURE TENSE WITH WILL

FUTURE TENSE WITH WILL

  • The simple future tense is used to make predictions for the future.
GRAMMAR FOCUS

  • Affirmative sentence
         Subject                                          base
                               +           WILL   +                 +   ______________
         pronoun                                        verb

          Ex:       I will arrive.               I'll arrive.
                      He will arrive.            He'll arrive.
                      She will arrive.          She'll arrive.
                      It will arrive.             It'll arrive.
                      We will arrive.           We'll arrive.

  • Negative Sentence
          Subject                                        base
                           +   WILL   +  NOT  +             +     ___________________
           pronoun                                       verb
                      
           Ex:
          
           I will not arrive.               I won't arrive.
           He will not arrive.            He won't arrive.
           She will not arrive.          She won't arrive.
           It will not arrive.             It won't arrive.
           We will not arrive.           We won't arrive.

  • Question
                        subject         base    
        WILL   +                  +               +     ____________  ?
                        pronoun        verb 

TIME EXPRESSIONS (p. 30 SB/ p. 30 WB)


MIGHT (SB p. 33     Wb p. 34)

  • The modal might is used to describe possibility in the present and future.
       Ex:  When are you going to clean your room?
              I don't know. I might clean it today or I might clean it next Saturday.

  • The modal might is an auxiliary verb that combines with the base form of the verb. It doesn't contract with subject pronouns.
        I
        you
        he
        she             might arrive
        it
        we
        they

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anjFtHbZabs

want to know more about modals? follow this link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEEMU3CDzBg

WARNINGS AND SAFETY RULES GAME

  • Take turns and choose a possible answer for each warning, use the modal might.
Warnings                                                     Possible responses

Take your umbrella!                                      bite
Don't touch that dog!                                    get a shock
Don´t play your music too loud!                    get hit
Don´t eat that!                                              need money
Don't pick up that box!                                   get sick
Take ten dollars more!                                   rain
Don't touch that wire!                                    get angry
Study every night!                                         hurt your back
Don't ride your bicycle in traffic!                     have a quiz


  • Look at these warning signs and create your own dialogs structuring both, the warning and the possible answer (don't forget to use might for your answer!)

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Chapter 5: COMPARATIVES

COMPARATIVES WITH -ER
  • To form the comparative, -er is added to one-syllable adjectives.
          EX:  soft - softer
                 small - smaller

  • For one-syllable adjectives that end in -e, only -r is added.
          EX: large - larger
                 safe - safer

  • For one-syllable adjectives that end with a single consonant preceeded by a single vowel, the final consonant is doubled, and -er is added.
         EX: big - bigger
                hot - hotter

  • For two syllable adjectives that end in -y preceeded by a consonant, the -y changes to i and -er is added.
          EX: fancy - fancier
                pretty - prettier

REFER TO:        SB: p.40      WB: p. 40

COMPARATIVES WITH MORE

  • The comparative of adjectives that have three or more syllables is formed by placing MORE before the adjective.
      EX: beautiful - more beautiful
            delicious - more delicious
  • The comparatives of two-syllable adjectives that don´t end in -y are less predictable. Some are formed with more, and some are formed with -er
      EX: honest - more honest
            simple - simpler
            quiet - quieter

REFER TO:  SB: p. 41         WB: p.p. 41-42

  • When comparing two items, the comaparive is used with THAN.
       EX:   Bicycles are safer than motorcycles.
               English is more useful than Latin.

SOME EXCEPTIONS TO THE RULE

bad - worse - the worst
good - better - the best
far - farther (further) - the farthest
little - less - the least
Want to test what you´ve learned about comparatives? click here:
http://www.better-english.com/grammar/comparatives.htm

PREFIXES AND SUFIXES

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Chapter 6: SUPERLATIVES

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SUPERLATIVES WITH -EST

  • The superlative of one-syllable adjectives is formed by adding -est.
          EX. kind - the kindest

  • For one-syllable adjectives that end in -e, only -st is added.
         EX: nice - the nicest

  • For one-syllable adjectives that end with a single consonant preceeded by a single vowel, the final consonant is doubled.
          EX: hot - the hottest

  • For two-syllable adjectives that end in -y preceeded by a consonant, -y changes to -i.
          EX: happy - the happiest

REFER TO:         SB P.50       WB   p.51




SUPERLATIVES WITH MOST

  • The superlative of adjectives that have three or more syllables is formed by placing the most before the adjective.
      EX:   beautiful   -   the most beautiful

  • The superlative of two-syllable adjectives that don´t end in -y are less predictable. Some are formed with most, and some are formed with -est.
       EX: patient   -   the most patient
             honest   -   the most honest
             simple   -    the simplest
             quiet     -    the quietest

REFER TO:      SB p.51       WB  p.p. 52-54

Want to know more about superlatives? click here:
http://www.inglesmundial.com/I14/grammar.htm