Sunday, February 23, 2020

GREETINGS FROM YOUR ENGLISH TEACHER





MY DEAR LEVEL 2 STUDENTS: Hi! this blog is an additional tool to learn effectively and encourages the student to learn as much as he wants about a certain topic, and not only what is taught in the book. IMPORTANT: this blog is not meant to be the class on line, it only highlights and enhances what is taught by your teacher in class. You´re welcome to write any comments and suggestions, and of course, to take as much advantage of this blog as you can.

Thursday, January 24, 2013

CHAPTER 1

      REMEMBER THIS! 


COPYRIGHT © 2001 BY PRENTICE HALL REGENTS ADDISON WESLEY LONGMAN, INC.
A PEARSON EDUCATION COMPANY.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


CLICK ON THE LINKS BELOW TO DO THESE EXERCICES
REVIEW TENSES






CHAPTER SUMMARY VIDEOS






To know more about the topic

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Thursday, August 4, 2011

CHAPTER 2: COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS


COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS (Student´s book p.12)
  • Count nouns are the ones you can count. Count nouns have a singular and a plural form.
          Examples:          I have an orange.
                                    She has five oranges.


  • Non-count nouns are the ones you can´t count. Non-count nouns have only one (singular) form.
           Examples:          Where is the flour?
                                      The flour is on the counter.


Workbook p.p. 12-13



USE OF ANY (page 13 student´s book)

The word ANY is used in negative statements and questions only, with non-count nouns and plural count nouns.
 Examples:
                 Is there any meat in the refrigerator?
                 No, there isn´t any meat in the refrigerator

                 Are there any potatoes in the cabinet?
                 No, there aren´t any potatoes in the cabinet.

                 - Let´s make some pizza for dinner!
                 - Sorry, we can´t. There isn´t any cheese.


Workbook: p.p.14-15




MUCH/ A LITTLE                       MANY/A FEW
Count and non-count nouns take different determiners.


  • The determiners much and a little are used with non-count nouns.
       Examples:        - How much sugar do you want with your coffee?
                              - Just a little (sugar)

                              - How much milk do you want (with your coffee)?

                              - Not too much, just a little.
  • The determiners many and a few are used with count nouns.
       Examples:        - How many meatballs do you want?
                              - Just a few (meatballs).

                               - How many cookies do you want?

                               - Not too many, just a few.

Workbook: p.p. 16-17


HOW MANY? / HOW MUCH? GAME

Of the nouns written below, ask the proper question:

french fries                                     
                                                     butter                                        
orange juice                                   rice
sugar                                             grapes
hamburguers                                  apples
sandwiches                                     eggs
flour                                               bread
mayonnaise                                    onions


TEAM GAME 

  • Name three breakfast foods.
  • Name three luch foods.
  • Name three dinner foods.
  • Name three dessert foods.

  1. What food can you make with flour, eggs, sugar, butter and milk?
  2. What food can you make with flour, tomatoes and cheese?
  3. What food can you make with meat, bread, ketchup and mustard?




HOW DO I KNOW IF IT´S COUNTABLE OR UNCOUNTABLE?

The non-coun nouns are also called uncountable or mass nouns.


What nouns are uncountable?


- Materials: wood, cotton, linen, silk, steel etc.             - Luggage  
- Advice                                                                     - Travel
- Hair                                                                        - Weather
- Knowledge                                                              - Information
- Spaguetti                                                                - Machinery
- English (language)                                                   - Furniture
- Health                                                                     - Intelligence
- Education                                                                - Clothing
- Soap                                                                       - Air
- Literature                                                                - Water


Examples:
  English is easy.                                    That was very much information.
  You have too much luggage.                 That furniture is expensive!
  Your advice was very useful.                 This machinery is very modern.

More information about count and non-count nouns:
http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/agree2a.html

WANT TO DO SOME EXERCISES WITH COUNT AND NON-COUNT NOUNS?
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/count1.htm
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/cgi-shl/par_numberless_quiz.pl/nouns_quiz.htm


NOW THE GAME!!
YOU HAVE TO KILL ALL THE COUNT NOUNS! BULLETS LIMITED, TIME LIMITED...READY? KIL 'EM ALL!
GO!
http://www.eflnet.com/grammar/cncgame.php

CLICK HERE TO DO  

Count and Non-Count Nouns exercises



COUNT/NON-COUNT NOUNS


CHAPTER SUMMARY VIDEOS








COPYRIGHT© 2001 BY PRENTICE HALL REGENTS ADDISON WESLEY LONGMAN, INC.
A PEARSON EDUCATION COMPANY.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

CHAPTER 3: PARTITIVES

INTRODUCTION OF PARTITIVES (SB: p.20)

a bag of                                a jar of
a bottle of                             a loaf of (two loaves of)
a bunch of                            a pint of
a box of                                a pound (lb) of
a can of                                a half pound of / half a pound of
a gallon of                            a quart of
a head of                              a dozen


  • Non-count nouns can't be counted, but they may be measured. Partitives measure specific quantities of non-count nouns. Partitives can be counted.
        Examples:        a head of lettuce
                                two heads of lettuce

                                a can of soup

                                two cans of soup


  •  Partitives can measure by weight or size.
         Examples:       a pound of cheese.
                                a gallon of milk.
                                a quart of orange juice.
                                a pint of ice cream.


  • Partitives can measure by describing the container.
        Examples:        a box of cereal
                                a bag of flour
                                a can of soup
                                a jar of jam
                                a bottle of ketchup


  • Partitives can measure by describing the shape.
        Examples:        a bunch of carrots
                                a head of lettuce
                                a loaf of bread


  • More partitives:
                                a bowl of                     a glass of
                                a cup of                       an order of
                                a dish of                      a piece of

       Examples: A bowl of strawberries
                        a cup of coffee
                        a dish of salad
                        a glass of water
                        an order of bacon
                        a piece of apple pie
                        


  • English measurements are different from the metric system:
        1 pound                 = 0.45    kilograms
        1 pint                     = 0.475 liters
        1 quart (2 pints)     = 0.95   liters
        1 gallon (4 quarts)  = 3.8     liters
WB: p.p. 21-23




HOW MUCH DOES A HEAD OF LETTUCE  COST?
DOLLARS AND CENTS (SB p.21)
  • Cent prices are written in two ways: with a cent sign (c) or with a dollar sign ($) and a decimal point.
        Examples: 10 c  =  $0.10
                         75 c  =  $0.75


  • There are two ways of expressing prices: formal and informal.
        Examples:   $1.25    =  (formal) one dollar and twenty-five cents
                                            (informal) a dollar twenty-five
               
                            $10.50  =  (formal) ten dollars and fifty cents
                                             (informal) ten fifty


WB: p. 24





WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE? (p.23 SB)

                                                  for breakfast/lunch/dinner?

 What would you like                   to eat/ drink/order?

                                                  for dessert?

RECIPES


  • The imperative is the base form of the verb, with you as the understood subject. The imperative is used to give introductions.
         Ex.: Chop up a few onions.
                 Add a little salt.


LET'S MAKE A RECIPE!

1.-  A quart/cold water                                 2.- 5 eggs            pepper
      Lemon Juice                                                 milk               butter
      Sugar                                                           salt                cheese

3.- Lettuce                                                    4.- hot milk
     tomatoes                                                       chocolate
     carrots                                                           sugar

5.- butter                                                       6.- butter
      milk                                                               salt
      flour                                                              onions
      eggs                                                              mushrooms
      salt                                                                water
      chocolate                                                       tomatoes
      baking powder                                               carrots
      sugar                                                             pepper 


Hot Chocolate          Image result for hot chocolate
Vegetable stew       Image result for vegetable stew
Omelette                      Image result for omelet
Salad                       Image result for salad
Cake                        Image result for cake
Lemonade                    Image result for lemonade



  DO THESE EXERCISES




IMPERATIVES
CHAPTER SUMMARY VIDEOS







COPYRIGHT © 2001 BY PRENTICE HALL REGENTS ADDISON WESLEY LONGMAN, 

INC.
A PEARSON EDUCATION COMPANY.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED